Royal titles: The surprising reason these FIVE royals gave up their titles – revealed

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ROYAL TITLES are part and parcel of being a member of the Royal Family – but what was the surprising reason these five royals gave up their titles.

Royal Family members around the world are granted a wealth of titles, patronages and duties in line with their status. However, throughout history and in more recent times, royals have sometimes chosen to give up these titles.

The surprising reason the five royals detailed below gave up their titles was down to love.

Duke and Duchess of Sussex

Meghan Markle wedded Prince Harry in May 2018, and before their wedding, the couple were given the titles His and Her Royal Highness (HRH), the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

However, in early January 2020, Meghan and Harry revealed plans to step back as senior royals and split their time between the UK and North America.

Royal titles: Prince Philip, Meghan Markle

Royal titles: The five royals who gave up their titles (Image: GETTY)

Royal titles: Meghan Markle and Prince Harry

Royal titles: To live independently, Meghan and Harry gave up their HRH titles (Image: GETTY)

As part of the announcement, they released a statement, which read: “After many months of reflection and internal discussions, we have chosen to make a transition this year in starting to carve out a progressive new role within this institution.

“We intend to step back as ‘senior’ members of the Royal Family and work to become financially independent, while continuing to fully support Her Majesty The Queen.”

After discussions with senior royals including the Queen, Prince Charles and Prince William, it was agreed when the couple stepped back in March 2020 they would lose their HRH titles along with their royal duties.

King Edward VIII

Not only did King Edward VIII lose his royal status, but he abdicated the throne after less than a year as king.

Royal titles: Edward VIII and Wallis Simpson

Royal titles: Edward VIII abdicated the throne to marry Wallis Simpson (Image: GETTY)

This paved the way for the now Queen’s father to succeed his older brother and take the throne, becoming King George VI.

Edward left the throne to marry Wallis Simpson, a divorcee.

At the time Edward was the nominal head of the Church of England – and the church did not allow for divorcees to remarry if their ex-spouse was still alive.

In his official statement, Edward said: “I have found it impossible to carry the heavy burden of responsibility and to discharge my duties as king as I would wish to do without the help and support of the woman I love.”

Prince Philip

The Queen’s husband, Prince Philip, was royalty in his own right before marrying then Princess Elizabeth.

He was heir to the thrones in both Greece and Denmark and in order to marry Elizabeth he had to rescind these titles.

After marrying Princess Elizabeth, Philip took his mother’s maiden name – Mountbatten.

For his sacrifice, the Queen then granted him titles like Baron Greenwich and Duke of Edinburgh.

Royal titles: Prince Philip and the Queen

Royal titles: Prince Philip rescinded his titles to marry then Princess Elizabeth (Image: GETTY)

Royal titles: Princess Mako of Japan

Royal titles: Princess Mako of Japan left royal life to marry a commoner (Image: GETTY)

Princess Mako

Another recent royal to turn her back on royal life was Princess Mako of Japan.

In 2017, Princess Mako renounced her title and claim to the throne to marry commoner Kei Komuro.

This was something dictated by Japanese law, which states a female royal must rescind her title if her partner does himself not have an aristocratic title.

Princess Mako’s move was not the first in Japan, as her aunt Princess Sayako married a commoner in 2005 – the first time a Japanese royal became a commoner.

Prince Friso of Orange Nassu

Prince Friso married Mable Wisse Smit in 2004, however, did so without the official Act of Consent from the Dutch Parliament.

Due to this, the Prince then abdicated his right to the throne.

Until Friso died in 2013, he and his family were considered members of the royal family, but not the Dutch Royal House.

Source: EXPRESS CO UK