Royal rivalry! Kate Middleton reveals Prince George is ‘jealous’ of Princess Charlotte’s lockdown schoolwork because it’s more fun – as she tells This Morning that she and Prince William are in daily contact with family members

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The Duchess of Cambridge has appeared on ITV’s This Morning today to discuss her new project with the National Portrait Gallery, and gave a glimpse at how George and Charlotte are coping with home schooling
Recycled the same £495 Raey dress she wore during last night’s appearance during her live appearance
Said George preferred Charlotte’s homework and to make ‘spider sandwiches’ and said they FaceTime the rest of the family every day. Also joked about her appearance after the Louis photoshoot with paint
Shared her key photography tip which was ‘not to set anything up too much and to capture the moment’
Hold Still is a community photography project, launched today, to paint picture of nation during Covid-19
Duchess of Cambridge, 38, is spearheading project in her role as patron of The National Portrait Gallery
People across UK invited to submit photographic portrait they have taken during these extraordinary times
Project will focus on three core themes – ‘Helpers and Heroes’, ‘Your New Normal’ and ‘Acts of Kindness’

The Duchess of Cambridge has appeared on ITV’s This Morning today to discuss her new project with the National Portrait Gallery, and gave a glimpse at how George and Charlotte are coping with home schooling.

Kate Middleton, 38, who has selected some of her favourite photographs that best capture the ‘resilience, bravery and kindness’ of Britons caught in the coronavirus crisis for the new project ‘Hold Still, joked that Prince George, 6, was ‘jealous’ of his five-year-old sister Princess Charlotte’s homework and ‘would rather make spider sandwiches’.

Appearing live via video link in the same £495 yellow, silk Raey dress she wore during last night’s appearance from Amner Hall, she spoke to Holly Willoughby and Phillip Schofield about the inspiration behind the project, and shared some of her own photography tips – including the importance of ‘capturing the moment’ and not ‘making it too set up’.

The royal, sporting her trademark blowdry, also joked that she was glad there were no pictures of how she ended up, after taking the pictures of Prince Louis covered in paint for his birthday portrait, and revealed they FaceTime family members ‘every day’.

Kate Middleton, 38, who has selected some of her favourite photographs that best capture the ‘resilience, bravery and kindness’ of Britons caught in the coronavirus crisis for the new project ‘Hold Still, joked that Prince George, 6, was ‘jealous’ of his five-year-old sister Princess Charlotte’s homework and ‘would rather make spider sandwiches

Speaking to Holly on how she is coping in these strangest of times, the Duchess responded: ‘Fine, thank you. It’s extraordinary. I’m sure you’re experiencing the same yourselves and your families and things. We’re stuck into homeschooling again. They’re unprecedented times really. But no we’re fine, thank you for asking.’

And talking about homeschooling, Kate revealed: ‘George gets very upset because he just wants to do all of Charlotte’s projects. Spider sandwiches are far cooler than literacy work’.

Addressing the inspiration behind her project, she said: ‘We’ve all seen incredible images and seen uplifting and sad stories, I really hope this project can showcase and document this moment in time that we’re all experiencing.

‘We’ve all been struck by the most amazing images that have come out that we’re going through desperately sad times. Those working on the front line are going through tragedy and hardships, it’s all those in the community and front line showing their amazing dedication.’

She added of an image of a nurse marked by a PPE mask: ‘It’s a really harrowing image, they’re the things that not everyone at home will witness, so it’s important to see what those on the front line are experiencing’.

Appearing via video link in the same floral Raey dress she wore during last night’s appearance, she spoke to Holly Willoughby and Phillip Schofield about the inspiration behind the project.

The royal, sporting her trademark blowdry, also joked that she was glad there were no pictures of how she ended up, after taking the pictures of Prince Louis covered in paint for his birthday portrait, and revealed they FaceTime the rest of the royal family 'every day'

Kate revealed Prince George, 6, was 'jealous' of his five-year-old sister Princess Charlotte's homework and 'would rather make spider sandwiches

The royal, sporting her trademark blowdry, also joked that she was glad there were no pictures of how she ended up, after taking the pictures of Prince Louis covered in paint for his birthday portrait, seen left, and revealed Prince George, 6, was ‘jealous’ of his five-year-old sister Princess Charlotte’s homework and ‘would rather make spider sandwiches (seen right at Christmas).

Speaking about the photo of a little girl named Edith kissing her grandparents through a window pane, she added: ‘Moments like this are so heartwarming to see, it’s different but still a connection. It really resonated with me that photograph.’

And the royal revealed the Cambridges are using FaceTime more than ever, explaining: ‘It’s really hard and we hadn’t done a huge amount of FaceTime but we’re doing that a lot more now.

‘We try to check in daily with family members and speak to them about news so in some way we’ve got a lot more contact than before, but it’s hard to explain to a five and six-year-old whats going on, but we have the support out there from schools’.

She continued of the competition: ‘Small acts of kindness go such a way, so I think it’s great to capture positive stories.

Kate added of an image of a nurse marked by a PPE mask: 'It's a really harrowing image, they're the things that not everyone at home will witness so it's important to see what those on the front line are experiencing'. ICU nurse Aimee Goold posted a heartbreaking image of her tired and scared face, pleading with people to stay home

Kate added of an image of a nurse marked by a PPE mask: ‘It’s a really harrowing image, they’re the things that not everyone at home will witness so it’s important to see what those on the front line are experiencing’. ICU nurse Aimee Goold posted a heartbreaking image of her tired and scared face, pleading with people to stay home.

A favourite of the Duchess - grandparents greeting their grandchildren from the other side of a window while social distancing

favourite of the Duchess – grandparents greeting their grandchildren from the other side of a window while social distancing Kate Middleton: It’s all about capturing the real moments.

‘Anyone can enter, schools can take this on as projects , life has changed for everyone and I think it’s important to tell the human side of this, being able to showcase portraits and collate a portrait of the nation on a human level is great.’

Talking about her photography tips she added: ‘I’m very much an amateur photographer but I take a lot of time now to pick up my camera and take pictures of the kids. It’s about not setting it up perfectly or clearing your home for the studio set up, but it’s capturing that moment, feeling or expression to tell that story.’

She went on to joke of Louis’ birthday portrait: ‘I should’ve taken a photograph of what I looked like after taking that picture of Louis, luckily that wasn’t documented.

‘Charlotte’s pictures told our story and hopefully others will do the same. I felt so lucky to be part of the Auschwitz project was such an honour.

‘It’s about taking time to reflect and tell the story for this period in time.

Kate has joined forces with the National Portrait Gallery to launch a community photography project designed to catch the ‘spirit, mood, hopes and fears’ of the nation.

The project, titled Hold Still, showcases the lives of those who have put everything on hold to help protect our NHS – and the reality of everyday life on the frontline for our helpers and heroes.

Kate, who spearheaded the campaign, is a patron of the National Portrait Gallery and a keen amateur photographer, aims to capture a snapshot of the UK at this time, with the help of the nation.

The Duchess will personally curate 100 photographs for the Hold Still exhibition.

The Duchess donned the silk £495 yellow, silk Raey midi dress from the Notting Hill based brand to launch the project yesterday, and recycled it today

The Duchess donned the silk £495 yellow, silk Raey midi dress from the Notting Hill based brand to launch the project yesterday, and recycled it today.

She said she had been ‘struck’ by the many ‘incredible’ images seen already, ‘which have given us an insight into the experiences and stories of people – some desperately sad images showing the human tragedy of this pandemic’.

Others, she said, had been more ‘uplifting’. Among her favourites are a five-year-old girl called Eaddee who wears a painted rainbow face for the NHS, 79-year-old Jack Dodsley dancing with a health worker at Newfield Nursing Home in Sheffield, grandparents greeting their grandchildren from the other side of a window, and Nottingham ICU nurse Aimee Goold.

The community photography project comes after the UK became the first country in Europe to record 30,000 deaths from the coronavirus yesterday, announcing 649 more victims. Now at a total of 30,076 dead because of the COVID-19 outbreak, the UK has hit the grim milestone before either Spain or Italy, which were widely considered to have the worst outbreaks in Europe. Only the US has recorded more fatalities, with 72,000.

People from across the UK are invited to submit a photographic portrait which they have taken during these extraordinary times for the community project.

Adorable - Here is a five-year-old girl called Eaddee who wears a painted rainbow face in support of the NHS

Adorable – Here is a five-year-old girl called Eaddee who wears a painted rainbow face in support of the NHS.

Pictured: 79-year-old Jack Dodsley dancing with a health worker at Newfield Nursing Home in Sheffield

Pictured: 79-year-old Jack Dodsley dancing with a health worker at Newfield Nursing Home in Sheffield.

The Duchess of Cambridge has joined forces with the National Portrait Gallery to launch a community photography project designed to capture the 'spirit, mood, hopes and fears' of the nation as it continues to battle coronavirus. Pictured during an interview, which will be broadcast on ITV's This Morning today

The Duchess of Cambridge has joined forces with the National Portrait Gallery to launch a community photography project designed to capture the ‘spirit, mood, hopes and fears’ of the nation as it continues to battle coronavirus. Pictured during an interview, which will be broadcast on ITV’s This Morning today.

The project - spearheaded by Kate, 38, who is patron of the National Portrait Gallery and a keen amateur photographer - is called Hold Still, and aims to capture a snapshot of the UK at this time, with the help of the nation

The project – spearheaded by Kate, 38, who is patron of the National Portrait Gallery and a keen amateur photographer – is called Hold Still, and aims to capture a snapshot of the UK at this time, with the help of the nation.

Participants are also encouraged to provide a short written submission to outline the experiences and emotions of those depicted in their photograph.

Hold Still is completely free, open to all ages and abilities, and will focus on three core themes – ‘Helpers and Heroes’, ‘Your New Normal’ and ‘Acts of Kindness’.

The idea is to create a unique photographic portrait of the people of our nation in lockdown as we ‘hold still’ for the good of others, and celebrate those who have continued so we can stay safe.

It will reflect resilience and bravery, humour and sadness, creativity and kindness, and human tragedy and hope.

Hold Still will also act as a reminder of the significance of human connection in times of adversity, and that although we were physically apart, as a community and nation, we all faced and rose to the challenge together.

For her interview today, Kate wore a stunning yellow bracelet-sleeve silk dress by British brand Raey, featuring a pink and green tree print. The dress is currently on sale on Matches Fashion for £148, reduced from £495.

Kate wore her brunette locks in loose waves around her shoulders and opted for her signature natural make-up, with brown eyeshadow and a nude lip.

On the launch of Hold Still, The Duchess said: ‘We’ve all been struck by some of the incredible images we’ve seen which have given us an insight into the experiences and stories of people across the country.

‘Some desperately sad images showing the human tragedy of this pandemic and other uplifting pictures showing people coming together to support those more vulnerable.

‘Hold Still aims to capture a portrait of the nation, the spirit of the nation, what everyone is going through at this time. Photographs reflecting resilience, bravery, kindness – all those things that people are experiencing.’

Submissions for Hold Still can be made from today (May 7) via www.npg.org.uk.

The closing date will be June 18, 2020. One hundred shortlisted portraits will then feature in a gallery without walls – a one of a kind digital exhibition open to all. A selection of images will also be shown across the UK later in the year.

The images can be captured on phones or cameras, and each image will be assessed on the emotion and experience it conveys rather than its photographic quality or technical expertise.

For 164 years, the National Portrait Gallery has existed to tell the stories of the people of Great Britain through the medium of portraits. In these unprecedented times, it is now more important than ever that we find ways to document and share our individual and collective stories of an experience which has impacted everybody’s lives in a multitude of ways.

Speaking about Hold Still, Nicholas Cullinan, director of the National Portrait Gallery London said: ‘Even if we are alone, we can all create something together.

‘We are honoured to partner with the Duchess of Cambridge on the Hold Still project, which will provide an inclusive perspective on, and an important historical record of, these unprecedented times, expressed through the faces of the nation.

In January, Kate took photographs of two Holocaust survivors with their grandchildren as part of the commemorations for the 75th anniversary of the end of the Holocaust. Steven Frank, 84, with his two granddaughters Maggie, 15, and Trixie, 13, was photographed holding a pan his mother used as a boy

In January, Kate took photographs of two Holocaust survivors with their grandchildren as part of the commemorations for the 75th anniversary of the end of the Holocaust. Steven Frank, 84, with his two granddaughters Maggie, 15, and Trixie, 13, was photographed holding a pan his mother used as a boy.

Kate invited Steven Frank, 84 and Yvonne Bernstein, 82, pictured, into her home that she shares with Prince William and her family in order to create the images which were inspired by Dutch artist Vermeer

Kate invited Steven Frank, 84 and Yvonne Bernstein, 82, pictured, into her home that she shares with Prince William and her family in order to create the images which were inspired by Dutch artist Vermeer.

‘The National Portrait Gallery reflects the history of Britain through the personal stories of the people who have helped to shape it. We are now inviting each and every person, across every city, town, village and home in the UK, to share their portraits with us in this unique collective endeavour.’

The Duchess of Cambridge has been Patron of the National Portrait Gallery since 2012, and has a lifetime honorary membership of the Royal Photographic Society. She has a longstanding interest in photography and its power to capture emotions and stories.

In January, Kate took photographs of two Holocaust survivors with their grandchildren as part of the commemorations for the 75th anniversary of the end of the Holocaust.

Kate invited Steven Frank, 84 and Yvonne Bernstein, 82 into her home that she shares with Prince William and her family in order to create the images which were inspired by Dutch artist Vermeer.

The Duchess of Cambridge (pictured), who is a patron of the Royal Photographic Society, took the photographs which were released to mark Holocaust Memorial Day and will be part of an exhibition later this year

The Duchess of Cambridge (pictured), who is a patron of the Royal Photographic Society, took the photographs which were released to mark Holocaust Memorial Day and will be part of an exhibition later this yearThe Duchess of Cambridge has a longstanding interest in photography and its power to capture emotions and stories, and often shares images she has taken of her children. Pictured: Photographs of Princess Charlotte, taken by Kate to mark her fifth birthday last week

The Duchess of Cambridge has a longstanding interest in photography and its power to capture emotions and stories, and often shares images she has taken of her children. Pictured: Photographs of Princess Charlotte, taken by Kate to mark her fifth birthday last week

The Duchess of Cambridge has a longstanding interest in photography and its power to capture emotions and stories, and often shares images she has taken of her children. Pictured: Photographs of Princess Charlotte, taken by Kate to mark her fifth birthday last week.

One photography expert told MailOnline that it was clear Kate had been influenced by ‘Vermeer’s study of light’.

The Duchess, who said their stories would ‘stay with her forever’, encouraged her subjects to hold ‘deeply personal’ items that reflected their time at Nazi camps.

Kate is also renowned for capturing enchanting, natural shots of her children, Prince George, six, Princess Charlotte, five, and Prince Louis, two.

To mark her youngest two children’s birthdays recently, Kensington Palace released stunning pictures of Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis, taken by their proud mother.

Both Kate and Prince William, 37, have continued to support charities and organisations close to their hearts despite the UK’s lockdown amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The royal couple have been using video calls to show their support, chatting about mental health, schools and the NHS, and clapping for the NHS every Thursday while isolating at Anmer Hall, their home in Norfolk.

Last week the Duchess paid a ‘morale-boosting’ virtual visit to a maternity unit in Kingston – where she previously spent two days on a work placement – last week, gushing her congratulations to stunned new mother Rebecca Attwood.

Rebecca, from Raynes Park in South-West London, said: ‘Having a surprise conversation with the Duchess of Cambridge after two hours’ sleep was particularly surreal.’

Source: DAILYMAIL MAILONLINE