Queen coronation: The FIVE things you didn’t know happened on the Queen’s coronation day

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THE QUEEN was crowned monarch of Great Britain and the Commonwealth 67 years ago today.

The Queen is currently the fourth longest-reigning monarch in history and the longest-reigning incumbent monarch. During her tenure, she has been a symbol of stability with the current coronavirus pandemic and worldwide protests no exception. But what surprising facts might you not have known about the Queen’s coronation day?

The Queen’s coronation took place on June 2, 1953, at Westminster Abbey when she was aged just 27 years old.

She officially ascended the throne upon her father’s death on February 6, 1952, while she was in Kenya, making her the first Sovereign in more than 200 years to accede while abroad.

The coronation was held more than a year after her father’s death which is tradition when crowning a new monarch following the death of their predecessor.

The 1953 Coronation was the first ever to be televised and was watched by 27 million people in the UK alone with many more watching around the world.

Queen coronation shock: The Queen

Queen coronation shock: The Queen’s coronation took place on June 2, 1953 (Image: GETTY)

Queen coronation shock: Royal couple

Queen coronation shock: The Queen has reigned for almost seven decades (Image: GETTY)

The Queen’s diadem

On the way to the coronation, the Queen wore the George IV State Diadem.

This is a very special diadem which is actually the crown depicted on postage stamps.

It was made in 1820 and features roses, shamrocks and thistles in addition to 1,333 diamonds and 169 pearls.

The crown places on the Queen’s head during the ceremony the St Edward’s Crown which was made of solid gold.

This headpiece was made in 1661 and weighs four pounds and 12 ounces.

For instance, one can of Heinz tomato soup weighs about 14 ounces which is just under one pound.

Queen coronation shock: Royals

Queen coronation shock: The Queen wore a crown which weighed four pounds and 12 ounces (Image: GETTY)

Children at the ceremony

Prince Charles was the first child to witness his mother’s coronation.

He was just four years old at the time of her ceremony.

Princess Anne was just two months shy of her second birthday at the time of the Queen’s coronation but was thought to be too young to attend the ceremony.

Jacqueline Bouvier attendance

In total, more than 2,000 journalists and 500 photographers from 92 nations covered the coronation.

Among the foreign journalists was Jacqueline Bouvier, who was later better known as Jackie Kennedy or Jackie O.

She was working for the Washington Times-Herald at the time, but just eight years later she would meet the Queen herself when she and husband President John F Kennedy visited Buckingham Palace.

Queen coronation shock: Coronation

Queen coronation shock: In total more than 2.000 journalists covered the coronation (Image: GETTY)

Oxen roast

The Ministry of Food granted 82 applications for people to roast oxen if they could prove that by tradition an ox had been roasted at previous coronations.

The oxen roast was a welcome concession at a time when the meat ration was just two shillings a week.

Rations were still in place across the UK at the time of the Queen’s coronation in June 1953 following the Second World War.

Coronation chicken

Coronation chicken was actually invented for the foreign guests who attended the coronation.

This dish did not in fact exist prior to its preparation for the Queen’s coronation.

The food was prepared in advance and florist Constance Spry propose a recipe of cold chicken in a curry cream sauce with a well-seasoned dressed salad of rice, green peas and mixed herb.

Constance Spry’s recipe won the approval of the Minister of Works and has since been known as Coronation Chicken.

Source: EXPRESS CO UK