Kate dazzles in POLKA DOTS during visit to World War 2 codebreaker HQ Bletchley Park

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KATE Middleton impressed the crowds as she wore a polka dot dress to an exhibition marking the 75th anniversary of D-Day at Bletchley Park.

The 37-year-old wore the same £1,750 Alessandra Rich frock she also wore for Prince Charles’ official 70th birthday portraits. Bletchley Park also holds a special personal significance to the Duchess of Cambridge. This is because her paternal grandmother, Valerie Glassborow, helped to decipher the secrets of the German Enigma machine at the site.

Kate Middleton wowed the crowds at Bletchley Park Image GETTY
Kate Middleton wowed the crowds at Bletchley Park Image GETTY

During her visit this afternoon, Kate will also meet schoolchildren who will attempt to take on the role of the 1944 codebreakers, by intercepting and deciphering communications.

This is not the first time the duchess has visited Bletchley Park, near Milton Keynes.

She met a group of veteran codebreakers during her last visit to the Buckinghamshire estate in 2014

This included some who worked with her grandmother during the Second World War.

Ms Glassborow and her twin sister Mary worked in Hut 16 at Bletchley Park, part of a team of codebreakers who unlocked the secrets of the German Enigma machine and helped win the war for Britain.

Miss Glassborow was like many other middle-class women at the time who helped to change the course of the war.

She got married to Peter Francis Middleton and had four sons, Michael, Richard, Simon and Nicholas.

Michael Middleton is the father of the Duchess of Cambridge.

The Duchess of Cambridge last visited Bletchley Park in 2014

The Duchess of Cambridge last visited Bletchley Park in 2014 (Image: REUTERS)

Meanwhile, her husband the Duke of Cambridge called for people involved in the “evil” illegal trade of animals to be jailed today.

William said the trade “remains deeply worrying” as he spoke at a meeting of seven conservation organisations which have united to prevent the trafficking of animals and sale of poaching products.

The United for Wildlife programme, run by The Royal Foundation of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, aims to bring together the private sector, police, governments and non-governmental organisations to disrupt the trade in items such as ivory and rhino horn.

During the first meeting of the group’s two taskforces on Tuesday at the Royal Geographic Society in Kensington, west London, William said: “It has taken a lot of hard work and real commitment to get to the point where you are all sitting here together today. And we should all feel proud that we’re starting to see an impact. But it’s just that. The start.

“For, although we have made progress, we are barely scratching the surface of what we can achieve. So, let today be a catalyst for our renewed ambition. The scale of what we are dealing with remains deeply worrying.”

Source: EXPRESS CO UK