Baby Archie shock: How royal title could link Harry’s son to Princess Eugenie and Beatrice

1645

PRINCE HARRY and Meghan Markle decided not to give their son Archie Harrison an official title at birth but there is one royal title that could connect him to Princess Beatrice and Eugenie in the future.

Meghan Markle, 38, and Prince Harry, 35, stepped down as senior royals in March and their decision to leave the royal bubble was in part motivated by their wish to give their one-year-old son Archie Harrison “a more peaceful life.”

Archie is currently living in Los Angeles with his parents and is expected to be raised in the USA.

While Archie may grow up miles away from his royal relatives, he has kept his place in the line of succession and will automatically become an HRH on Prince Charles’s accession to the throne.

Archie is also expected to inherit Prince Harry’s Duke of Sussex title on his father’s death.

However, there is another dukedom that could link Archie to his distant royal cousins Princess Beatrice, 31, and Princess Eugenie, 30, in future.

Baby Archie shock

Baby Archie shock: How royal title could link Harry’s son to Princess Beatrice and Eugenie (Image: GETTY/SAVE THE CHILDREN UK)

Baby Archie shock

Baby Archie shock: Harry and Meghan hope to give Archie a more peaceful life outside the royal bubble (Image: GETTY)

Princess Beatrice and Eugenie’s father Prince Andrew, 60, is also known as the Duke of York.

Andrew was made the Duke of York by his mother Queen Elizabeth II on his wedding day in 1986.

The Queen traditionally gifts dukedoms to her son’s and grandsons when they marry, including Prince Harry who became the Duke of Sussex when he tied the knot with Meghan.

Dukedoms are hereditary peerages and because the law of male primogeniture still exists in the UK they can only be passed on from man to man.

Baby Archie shock

Baby Archie shock: Prince Harry could be the next Duke of York after Prince Andrew (Image: GETTY)

This means that neither of Prince Andrew’s daughters will inherit his dukedom and that it will have to go to a male Royal Family member.

The dukedom of York is traditionally held by the presiding sovereign’s second son and if Charles is on the throne when Prince Andrew dies then Harry could inherit the royal title.

Constitutional expert Iain MacMarthanne told Express.co.uk: “Without a son, and by the terms of the letters patent under which the dukedom of York was again created in 1986, the death of the present duke will see the title merge with the crown.

“Historically it is a title that has been granted to the second son of the sovereign.

“Arguably, with Charles’ accession, Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex becomes the sovereign’s second son and could under the custom become the next Duke of York in addition to being duke of Sussex.”

If Prince Harry was to become the Duke of York then Archie would have something in common with Princess Eugenie and Beatrice.

He like them would have a father who held the historic title.

However, the tradition of royals having more than one dukedom at a time has fallen slightly out of fashion, Mr MacMarthanne explained.

He said: “The fashion for creating multiple dukedoms, such as during the reign of Victoria has however died out.

“Additionally, the custom of new creations has invariably become linked with marriage and as that has already occurred, together with his withdrawal from front line royal duties, his creation as Duke of York seems unlikely, should the title be available.”

Baby Archie shock

Baby Archie shock: Archie can chose whether or not to use his royal title when he’s 18 (Image: Save the Children UK)

This being the case, Kate, Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William’s second son Prince Louis is most likely to be the Duke of York next.

Mr MacMarthanne added: “As such, Prince Louis of Cambridge is presently the most likely candidate to become the next Duke of York.

“However, it will be for the sovereign of the day to determine its usage when it becomes available to be granted in future generations.”

Archie will be able to decide whether or not to use a royal title when he reaches 18.

Source: EXPRESS CO UK